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What Are the Different Types of Invoices?

If youare a freelancer, contractor, or business owner, you know how crucial it is to...

The Solution to Creating Recurring Invoices

Having a regular flow of monthly income can be helpful, especially in certain seasons where...

Best Invoice App for Freelancers

As a freelancer, the way you manage your business impacts your career. Success is not...

How to Make An Invoice

Youave set up a business and gained customers patronizing your products. And now you have...

Best Invoice App for Contractors

Getting paid for the hard work youave done feels greataespecially when you get compensated for...

What Information Should Be On A Standard Invoice?

While invoicing may not be the most exciting part of a business, itas crucial to...

How Do I Charge Taxes Using the Invoice Generator?

Charging taxes using invoice generator is easy and simple with Sparks Invoice Maker. We built...

Invoice on the Go: Top 5 Reasons to Use an App

If youare a brick-and-mortar retailer, eCommerce owner, or freelancer, you probably have noticed how todayas...

Top 10 Reasons Spark Is the Best Free Invoice Generator

Invoice generators are power tools when it comes to managing your business. Thanks to them,...

Why You Need An Invoice Generator & Invoice Maker for Small Business

Invoices are crucial for entrepreneurs to get paid for the goods or services they offer....

Apple reportedly just fired another employee who brought attention to issues at the company

Amid ongoing internal strife among Apple employees, Apple is said to have fired one of the organizers of an internal worker movement.

Former police chief charged in Capitol riot requests to defend himself in order to expose 'corruption' of FBI investigation into attack

Prosecutors say he has ties to the far-right extremist group Three Percenters. The judge said those who represent themselves have "a fool for a client."

Facebook adopts new policies to combat coordinated intimidation and harassment of public figures

It expanded its definition of what it considers to be harassment under its policy after speaking with stakeholders about their personal experiences.

How to view Instagram Stories anonymously in 3 different ways

You can view Instagram Stories anonymously by using an unidentifiable account or, to an extent, by turning on airplane mode.

Elizabeth Holmes trial Week 6 recap: Trouble with Safeway and Walgreens deals, and how a dermatologist became the startup's lab director

Former Safeway and Walgreens executives testified about their companies' failed deals with Theranos. One said he had "never been more frustrated."

How to connect an Xbox controller to your iPhone to play games and more

You can connect nearly any Xbox controller to an iPhone, whether it's from the Xbox One or Xbox Series X/S.

Elizabeth Warren calls Amazon a 'monster that has to be fed every minute' as she pushes to break up the company

Warren criticized the retailer for selling everyday products while also controlling the primary platform people use to purchase such products.

How to connect Alexa to your lights and turn them on and off with a single command

You can connect your Alexa device to smart lights in your house and set up context-aware lighting using the Alexa app.

How to turn off autoplaying previews and shows on Netflix

To turn off autoplaying videos on Netflix, head to your account's "Playback settings" page in a web browser.

How to reset an Amazon Echo speaker from the Alexa app or from the device

You can reset an Amazon Echo speaker by pressing buttons on the physical device or via the Alexa app.

How to view and delete your Amazon Prime Video watch history

To view and delete your Amazon Prime Video watch history, go to the Settings page of Amazon Prime Video.

How to turn off and opt out of Amazon Sidewalk to save your bandwidth

If you want to opt out of Amazon Sidewalk on your various Amazon devices, you can disable the feature from your Alexa app.

A major logistics company is 'effectively sold out' of warehouse space as supply chain issues grow

Prologis said 98% of its warehouse spaces was leased as of September 30 amid soaring demand that led to "record increases" in rent prices.

62 affordable yet thoughtful gifts for her that are all under $50

We've found 62 gifts she's sure to love, and none cost more than $50. From jewelry to cookbooks and plants to painting kits, we have you covered.

Apple is expected to reveal new MacBook Pros on October 18 - here's how to watch the big announcement

Apple may announce a new MacBook Pro, Mac Mini, and more during its latest launch event. You can watch the announcement on October 18 at 1 p.m. ET.

27 cool gift ideas for the music lover in your life

If they love music, you'll want to gift them something that reflects their passion. These gifts are perfect for musicians and music fans alike.

A Russian spacecraft pushed the space station out of position and sent astronauts into emergency mode - again

A Russian actress and director are on the station filming a movie in space. They're supposed to return on the glitching spaceship.

Codecademy's annual memberships are 40% off now until October 22, giving you access to unlimited online coding courses for $144

A-Pro membership gets you unlimited access to all of Codecademy's online coding and programming courses, including certificates of completion.

The best toaster ovens we tested in 2021

Toaster ovens are perfect for quick meals and small living spaces that don't have room for a full oven. These are the best toaster ovens of 2021.

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September News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

2021 National Book Festival Starts Tomorrow!


June News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

Celebrating Juneteenth, Pride Month, & More!


Take the Library of Congress Survey

Over the past year, like you, the Library of Congress has adjusted, recalibrated and learned. We want to continue to learn from you about what more we can do. As a friend of the Library of Congress, your feedback is critical to us as we look to the future. The Library of Congress is your library and we want to build plans based on YOU.

Please take a moment to complete the survey and share more about how you’ve engaged with the Library, what we can do better, and what more you want to see from us. No matter where you are in the country (or world!), or how you’ve connected with the Library before – we want your feedback.

Take the survey: https://wh.snapsurveys.com/s.asp?k=162090351735&src=1

The survey will close in 10 days, so please take 10 minutes to complete it now. We look forward to sharing the insights we learn and, most importantly, using your feedback to chart the path forward.

Thanks for your time!

Carla Hayden
Librarian of Congress


Late May News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

Library to Reopen Four Reading Rooms June 2


April News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

April is National Poetry Month


Preservation News: Webinars Planned for Preservation Week, April 26th-April 30th

The Library of Congress Preservation Directorate is excited to present a Topics in Preservation Series (TOPS) for Preservation Week 2021! We are hosting webinars every day April 26th-April 30th of Preservation Week at 11am (EST). The five webinars will feature preservation related projects conducted at the Library. You can find the registration links on our webpage or use the links below to the five webinars.

Preservation Meets Public Health: Enduring Lessons from Pandemic Planning

Monday April 26, 11am EST

Presenter: Jacob Nadal, Director for Preservation

This presentation will explain how the Library of Congress staff used information from the REALM project in conjunction with public health guidance to develop safe operations plans for activities that involved the Library’s collections. Jake will unpack the decision-making processes that staff used to allow the agency to operate safely, adapt to developments in the pandemic, and incorporate lessons-learned to improve future operating plans. These include adjustments to collections management processes and hybrid on-site/telework operations for conservation, scientific research, and preservation services.

https://loc.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_xw6TlmaVSPumWNgjPbnc-Q

 

Collections Management Division: Restarting Operations During a Pandemic

Tuesday April 27, 11am EST

Presenter: Matthew Martin, Assistant Chief (acting), CMD

Preservation Directorate’s Collections Management Division prioritized its workload during the pandemic in light of limited on-site staff and the need to re-evaluate processes and procedures to ensure safety and efficiency. CMD’s mission is two-pronged, to promote and provide access to the Library’s collection and to manage inventory and to ensure, accuracy, security, retrievability, and preservation of items in the collections.

https://loc.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_qd708pWCS12rUDpoiuNIlg

 

Focus on Scientific Reference Samples: Center for Heritage Analytical Reference Materials (CHARM)

Wednesday April 28, 11am EST

Presenter: Dr. Fenella G. France, Chief, Preservation Research and Testing Division

One preservation challenge for understanding cultural heritage collection materials and their deterioration is due to the lack of documentation for older storage, handling, and repair histories. Having physical reference samples that replicate all the materials in our collections allows us to both recreate and assess treatments, undergo destructive testing and accelerated aging, and use these results to correlate physical and non-invasive test methods. The creation of the “go-team” in the Preservation Research and Testing Division (PRTD) has expanded the capacity for non-invasive analyses of collection materials. PRTD staff have created guidelines for baseline characterization, test methods, linking and visualizing datasets, and utilizing and making available CHARM collection materials for sharing and collaboration with heritage partners to assist with preservation decision-making.

https://loc.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_xLMOKzKETG-kZ6V2KDW_7g

 

Librarians-in-Residence: Training the Next Generation

Thursday April 29, 11am EST

Speakers: Adrija Henley, Chief, Preservation Services Division with former LIRs Jon Sweitzer-Lamme, Zach Maiorana, and Katie Daughtry

The Librarians-in-Residence program was established in 2018 for recent graduates of Library and Information Science programs. The goal of this program is to develop the next generation of librarians and provide the opportunity to gain meaningful professional work experience. In the past three years, Preservation Directorate hosted three Librarians-in-Residence (LIR). Each of them spent 10 months working on various projects and assignments across the Preservation Directorate, to give them a range of valuable skills and knowledge. In this presentation, Adrija Henley will talk about the LIR program and will introduce other Librarians in Residence who will share their own experiences at the Library. We hope that our discussion will generate interest and excitement for the development of other residency programs and for future LIR program applicants. 

https://loc.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_aoYsT2JoSb6srALLmuGnjg

 

Peek inside the Lab: Two Mini Presentations

Friday April 30, 11am EST

The Conservation and Digitization of the Yongle Dadian

Speakers: Alan Haley, Senior Preservation Specialist and Dan Paterson, Senior Conservator

Presenters will discuss the condition review, conservation treatment, and digitization of the Yongle Dadian, a manuscript encyclopedia from around 1565. The encyclopedia was first commissioned in 1403 by the Yongle emperor. When completed in 1408 the Yongle Dadian comprised 11,095 manuscript volumes, recording an enormous scope of Chinese life and culture. It is believed that none of the original 1408 volumes survived, but there are approximately 400 known volumes from the 16th century edition. This presentation will discuss how success of this project is dependent on conservation team working together with the other library entities, and how the size of the Yongle Dadian, its complicated history, and cultural significance impacted each phase of decision making process.

American Book Design Buffet

Speaker: Leslie Long, Senior Preservation Specialist, Conservation Division,

This presentation will focus on three important people in the world of 19th and early 20th century book design:   John Feely, Sarah Wyman Whitman and Margaret Armstrong.  All three were working in the years that are referred to as the golden age of book design – the feast of books published with beautiful covers between 1870 and 1920.  The remarkable thing about this age of beautiful books is they were every day books for every day buyers, modestly priced and widely available. 

https://loc.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_Rk-XIBb2S6yja0LsscBuOg

Please request ADA accommodations at least five business days in advance by contacting (202) 707-6362 or ada@loc.gov.

Click here for more information.


Celebrating Women's History Month

News from the Library of Congress

Celebrating Women's History Month


Celebrating Black History Month

News from the Library of Congress

Celebrating Black History Month


January News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

Inaugurations Past, Presidential Papers and Pandemic Photo Collecting


November News from the Library of Congress

November News from the Library of Congress

November is Native American Heritage Month

What started at the turn of the century as an effort to create a day of recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S., has resulted in a month being designated for that purpose.

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans with this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/A



Starting Today! The Virtual National Book Festival is THIS Weekend

This Friday through Sunday! The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival is Virtual

The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival is celebrating its 20th birthday this year! Join us this weekend at loc.gov/bookfest for an interactive, online celebration of American Ingenuity featuring more than loc120 authors, poets and illustrators at the first virtual event in the festival’s history. Connect with your favorite writers across all genres at our virtual “stages” including, Children, Teens, Family, Food & Field, Fiction, Genre Fiction, History & Biography sponsored by Wells Fargo, Poetry & Prose sponsored by National Endowment for the Arts, Science, and Understanding Our World.

View the full author lineup: loc.gov/events/2020-national-book-festival/authors/?loclr=ealn

Complete Your FREE Registration and Sign In Now

Create your FREE account now at loc.gov/bookfest to access on-demand videos, live author chats and discussions during the Festival weekend, Sept. 25 – 27. You’ll have options to personalize your own festival journey with timely topics, and to explore book buying possibilities through the festival’s official bookseller, Politics & Prose.


Today! A Day of Programming for Schools, Children & Teens at Home

Video interviews with popular authors of books for children and young adults, as well as two 1-hour video specials, are available for on-demand viewing starting today at 9 a.m. ET on the festival platform under the “Stages” tab. Log on at loc.gov/bookfest or view on the Library’s YouTube channel at youtube.com/loc/.

Young people can also check out the Roadmap to Reading, which features a list of “Great Reads from Great Places” – 53 books that reflect the literary heritage of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Don't miss live Q&As with some of today's most popular children and young adult authors – including Chelsea Clinton and Veronica Chambers. Visit loc.gov/bookfest for a complete schedule.

Download this Learning Guide for tips and suggestions on experiencing the virtual festival all weekend long with the kids and teens in your life: loc.gov/static/events/2020-national-book-festival/documents/NBF2020-Learning-Guide.pdf


The Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction and Literacy Awards to be given at Festival

Each year we take the opportunity of the Library of Congress National Book Festival to award a series of important prizes that celebrate and honor literature and literacy. This year, Colson Whitehead, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novels “The Nickel Boys” and “The Underground Railroad,” will receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction during the festival. The author will take part in a live Q&A event and talk about his life and work at this year’s National Book Festival, Saturday, Sept. 26 at 11 a.m. Also, five organizations working to expand literacy and promote reading will be awarded the 2020 Library of Congress Literacy Awards.

Read more: blogs.loc.gov/national-book-festival/2020/09/our-award-winners-colson-whitehead-literacy-honorees/


Watch the PBS Television Special on Sunday

Also a first in the festival’s history, the festivities will culminate with a PBS television special! Watch “The Library of Congress National Book Festival: Celebrating American Ingenuity,” hosted by Hoda Kotb on Sunday, Sept. 27, 6-8 p.m. ET/PT (check local listings and PBS streaming info).

 

 


Festival Shop

The National Book Festival may be virtual, but you can still receive actual merchandise to help capture the memories this year. Purchase swag at our on-line shop where you can also order a FREE commemorative tote bag courtesy of our media partner, C-SPAN. 

SHOP: library-of-congress-shop.myshopify.com/collections/national-book-festival

Order books by featured authors from the Festival’s official bookseller – Politics & Prose – within the online platform at loc.gov/bookfest. A limited number of signed copies are available.

The 2020 National Book Festival poster is available for download at loc.gov/programs/national-book-festival/about-this-program/poster-gallery/. Also, a printed version of the poster will be shipped to you with a donation of $25 or more to support the National Book Festival from either our official bookseller, Politics & Prose, at this location politics-prose.com/national-book-festival-donation or the Library of Congress website at loc.gov/donate/ (select "National Book Festival").


#NatBookFest - Follow & Share on Social Media

Follow our social media accounts, re-post festival info, and share your own posts about the event and your favorite presenting authors using the hashtag #NatBookFest. We’ve even created a fun Facebook frame for your profile picture to let friend know you’ll be there! (While logged into Facebook, select your profile picture > select Add Frame > search for National Book Festival Badge 2020 > select then save.)

  • Twitter @librarycongress: twitter.com/librarycongress
  • Instagram @librarycongress: instagram.com/librarycongress
  • Facebook @libraryofcongress: facebook.com/libraryofcongress
  • Festival Facebook event: facebook.com/events/492391091592698/

Thank You to Our National Book Festival Supporters

The festival is free to the public with support from our sponsors and donors including National Book Festival Co-Chair, David M. Rubenstein, Charter Sponsor, The Washington Post, Patrons, Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Endowment for the Arts, Wells Fargo, Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission, and many Friends and Media Partners. The full list can be found at loc.gov/events/2020-national-book-festival/sponsors/.

Our partners have even transformed their traditional Festival booths and are bringing you read-alongs, fun videos, author features, activities to download and giveaways — all online. Take a look at the schedule of those activities here, then log in to the platform to access them today. More: blogs.loc.gov/national-book-festival/2020/09/festival-partners-family-friendly-activities-are-back/

Please join us in thanking all of our supporters and consider making your gift to the Library of Congress at loc.gov/donate.

 


Virtual National Book Festival Sept. 25-27 a Register Now!

2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival: Celebrating American Ingenuity

The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival will celebrate its 20th birthday this year! And, for the first time in its history, the event will be completely virtual. Join us next weekend for an interactive, online celebration of American Ingenuity featuring more than 120 authors, poets and illustrators. The festivities will culminate with a PBS television special “The Library of Congress National Book Festival: Celebrating American Ingenuity,” hosted by Hoda Kotb on Sunday, Sept. 27, 6-8 p.m. ET/PT (check local listings).

Register Today! 

Create your FREE account now at loc.gov/bookfest to access on-demand videos, live author chats and discussions during the Festival weekend, Sept. 25 – 27. You’ll have options to personalize your own festival journey with timely topics, and to explore book buying possibilities through the festival’s official bookseller, Politics & Prose.


Check Out the Author Lineup

More than 120 renowned authors, poets and illustrators are taking part in our virtual festival! Connect with your favorite writers across all genres at our virtual “stages” including, Children, Teens, Family, Food & Field, Fiction, Genre Fiction, History & Biography sponsored by Wells Fargo, Poetry & Prose sponsored by National Endowment for the Arts, Science and Understanding Our World.

View the full author lineup: loc.gov/events/2020-national-book-festival/authors/


Explore Timely Topics

New to this year’s festival is an opportunity to take a deeper dive into timely topics engaged by many books across the festival’s stages. You are invited to follow three newsworthy threads that weave through the festival and offer a more profound appreciation for the subjects. They are:

• “Fearless Women” – books by and about strong women and trailblazers.
• “Hearing Black Voices” – books that showcase Black voices across all genres, affirming their contributions to American culture.
• “Democracy in the 21st Century” – books that assess the state of democratic principles in America and around the globe.


Friday, Sept. 25: A Day of Programming for Schools, Children & Teens at Home

The Library of Congress National Book Festival will present a robust lineup of live and recorded programming featuring all-star authors for schools and young audiences at home on Friday, Sept. 25. Video interviews with popular authors of books for children and young adults, as well as two 1-hour video specials, will be available for on-demand viewing starting at 9 a.m. ET on the festival website at loc.gov/bookfest and on the Library’s YouTube channel at youtube.com/user/LibraryOfCongress.

Young people can also check out the Roadmap to Reading, which features a list of “Great Reads from Great Places” – 53 books that reflect the literary heritage of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Read more: loc.gov/item/prn-20-061/


Help Spread the Word

Forward this email to your friends and family and encourage them to “meet” you at the festival. Follow our social media accounts, re-post festival info, and share your own posts about the event and your favorite presenting authors using the hashtag #NatBookFest. We’ve even created a fun Facebook frame for your profile picture to let friends know you’ll be there! (While logged into Facebook, select your profile picture > select Add Frame > search for National Book Festival Badge  2020 > select then save).

  • Twitter @librarycongress: twitter.com/librarycongress
  • Instagram @librarycongress: instagram.com/librarycongress
  • Facebook @libraryofcongress: facebook.com/libraryofcongress

Thank you to our National Book Festival Supporters

The festival is free to the public with support from our sponsors and donors including National Book Festival Co-Chair, David M. Rubenstein, Charter Sponsor, The Washington Post, Patrons, Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Endowment for the Arts, Wells Fargo, Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission, and many Friends and Media Partners. The full list can be found at loc.gov/events/2020-national-book-festival/sponsors/.

Please join us in thanking all of our supporters and consider making your gift to the Library of Congress at loc.gov/donate.

 


August News from the Librarian of Congress

Friends,

What an eventful summer this has been. I hope that you are staying well as we begin another month in a most unusual year.

As August begins, all Library of Congress buildings and facilities remain closed to the public until further notice. You can continue to check the latest information regarding our COVID-19 response at this website.

Even so, the work of the Library continues, as we bring more public programming online, continue the work of digitizing more collections to make them available outside of the Library’s walls, and explore new ways to celebrate milestones in the history of the Library and of this nation virtually.

In that spirit, we will host our signature event, the annual Library of Congress National Book Festival, virtually this year. I hope you will join us to celebrate “American Ingenuity” with more than 120 renowned writers, poets and artists in an interactive, online experience for this 20th year of the festival. Save the date! It will take place September 25-27.

Today, we are also virtually celebrating the 150th anniversary of the U.S. Copyright Office with an event at noon ET. Make sure you register now for this free event.

August also marks 100 years since the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted women the right to vote. Our current exhibition “Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote” is available online and is an excellent resource to discover more about the long fight for women’s suffrage. We are also joining forces with the Smithsonian and National Archives to present the #19SuffrageStories social media campaign and shed light on the stories of suffragists, including women of color, who have traditionally been overlooked.

Read more about these events, the campaign, and a few new online collections below.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


TODAY: Copyright Office Presents: 150 Years of Celebrating Creativity

On July 8, 2020, the U.S. Copyright Office of the Library of Congress turned 150 years old. Copyright Office history reflects the United States’ creative and technical innovations, important judicial rulings, and diplomatic treaties.

Today, August 4 at noon ET join the online event, “Copyright Office Presents: 150 Years of Celebrating Creativity” to hear from three engaging Copyright Office experts, and to explore how the role of the Office and its operations changed along with the law itself.

This online event is free, but registration is required: copyright.gov/events/


#19SuffrageStories

Women fought long and hard for the vote—before and after the passage of the 19th Amendment, which declares the right to vote “shall not be denied … on account of sex.” Diverse communities and organizations blazed the trail for equal voting rights across the nation. For many women, especially women of color, the fight didn’t end when the 19th Amendment went into effect on August 26, 1920. Yet the stories of these suffragists have often been overlooked.

Tune in on Instagram and Twitter to learn 19 stories you may not know from the Library of Congress, Smithsonian and National Archives. Every weekday from August 3 through Women’s Equality Day, August 26, we’re counting down from 19 to 1 with a new story each day on our Instagram and Twitter feeds.

Learn More: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/08/counting-down-with-19suffrage-stories-100th-anniversary-of-the-19th-amendment/


The Library of Congress National Book Festival is Going Virtual – Save the Date!

The 20th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival will be held online Sept. 25-27. The festival will connect with audiences across the country for an interactive, online celebration of “American Ingenuity” featuring new books by more than 120 of the nation’s most-renowned writers, poets and artists.

Virtual stages will offer on-demand videos, live author chats and discussions, options to personalize your own journey through the festival with particular themes, and book buying possibilities through the festival’s official bookseller, Politics & Prose, with a limited number of commemorative book plates signed by authors.

Check out the full author lineup and download the new festival poster today!

Festival website: loc.gov/bookfest

Latest festival press release: loc.gov/item/prn-20-048/


Historic Public Affairs Series "Black Journal" Now Available Online

A collection of episodes from “Black Journal,” the first nationally televised public affairs program produced for, about, and by Black Americans has been released by The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between WGBH and the Library of Congress. Largely unseen since they aired between 1968 and 1977, the 59 episodes have been digitized from archival tape in the Library’s collection and are now available to stream for free online. Accompanying the “Black Journal” episodes is a collection of essays that explore the public television programs that put Black issues and Black perspectives at the forefront in the wake of the civil rights movement.

Read the announcement: loc.gov/item/prn-20-047/


William Howard Taft Papers Collection Now Available Online

The papers of William Howard Taft (1857-1930), twenty-seventh president of the United States and tenth chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, consist of approximately 676,000 documents (785,977 images), which have been digitized from 658 reels of previously reproduced microfilm. Held in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division, these papers constitute the largest collection of original Taft documents in the world. The collection contains family papers, personal and official correspondence, presidential and judicial files, speeches and addresses, legal files and notebooks, business and estate papers, engagement calendars, guest lists, scrapbooks, clippings, printed matter, memorabilia, and photographs dating from 1784 to 1973, with the bulk of the material dated 1880-1930.

View collection: loc.gov/collections/william-howard-taft-papers/about-this-collection/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Celebrating Independence Day

Friends,

I hope that you are doing well. As we enter into July, it is hard to believe the many changes and challenges we’ve had to face in our world in just the past few months. The upcoming July 4th holiday is another reminder of the ways we’ve all had to adjust and rework communal celebrations and gatherings in the age of COVID-19.

Many of you have celebrated birthdays and graduations virtually, and have come up with creative ways to stay in touch with family and friends from a distance. The Library of Congress is no different, and we continue to adapt to stay connected with you even as our doors remain closed. This is especially important as we strive to offer a safe place to have difficult conversations about the challenges facing our nation today with regard to race, inequality and social justice.

To that end, below you will find information on some of our upcoming virtual events including today’s conversation with new Kluge Prize winner, Danielle Allen, who will take on the hard questions about democracy and public life. Our online series, “Hear You, Hear Me”: Conversations on Race in America, also continues this month.

You can also learn more about the major collections work we are undertaking to document the pandemic in an informative new blog post, “How Will We Remember COVID-19?”

And, as we prepare to celebrate Independence Day, it must be noted that the Library of Congress is home to the original rough draft of the Declaration of Independence. It is one of the institution’s top treasures. View it online here, https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/tr00.html, and discover other resources related to our nation’s independence below.

Have a safe holiday weekend.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


[Detail] Currier & Ives print showing the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
loc.gov/resource/pga.08583/

Independence Day

American Treasures of the Library of Congress: Declaration of Independence
loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/tr00.html

Declaration of Independence: Primary Documents in American History
guides.loc.gov/declaration-of-independence

American Revolution: A Resource Guide
guides.loc.gov/american-revolution

Thomas Jefferson Papers Collection
loc.gov/collections/thomas-jefferson-papers/about-this-collection/


TODAY: Kluge Prize Winner Danielle Allen

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced last week that Danielle Allen, director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, will receive the 2020 John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity. Allen will work with the Library to share her expertise on justice, citizenship and democracy with a wide audience.

Today at 7 p.m. ET join Allen and Kluge Center Director John Haskell for a virtual event: “Danielle Allen Takes on the Hard Questions about Democracy and Public Life.” This presentation will premiere with closed captions on both the Library's Facebook page and the Library's YouTube site and be available afterwards on the Library's video page.

Kluge Prize Announcement: loc.gov/item/prn-20-043/


Homegrown at Home Concert Series

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress is presenting traditional music and dance from a variety of folk cultures thriving in the United States and around the world in a new online concert series each Wednesday through September. Tune in to “Homegrown at Home” Wednesdays at noon ET on the American Folklife Center Facebook page, and replay performances anytime on the Library of Congress YouTube channel and on the Library's video page.

Series info & schedule: loc.gov/item/prn-20-045/


"Hear You, Hear Me": Conversations on Race in America

This online series continues featuring Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in conversation with some of the nation’s great literary figures, and will highlight what poetry and literature can offer the nation as it contends with foundational issues of social justice.

  • Joy Harjo and Tracy K. Smith - Thursday, July 9, 2020, 7-8 p.m. ET
  • Colson Whitehead - Thursday, July 16, 2020, 7-8 p.m. ET

Event details & videos: loc.gov/programs/national-book-festival/national-book-festival-presents/


[Detail] Life during the pandemic. Photo: Camilo Vergara. Prints and Photographs Division.

How Will We Remember COVID-19?

The Library is amassing a vast collection of materials that document the COVID-19 pandemic, including the award-winning photography of Camilo Vergara. These photographs are among the very first items the Library acquired documenting the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. And they will be far from the last: The Library anticipates a collecting effort that exceeds its coverage of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks — which was huge.

Read the full blog post: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/06/how-will-we-remember-covid-19/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Celebrating Juneteenth & More

Friends,

Today is Juneteenth, thought to be the longest running celebration of the end of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, notice of the Emancipation Proclamation freeing enslaved people finally reached Texas through an order read aloud by Union General Gordon Grange in Galveston. The word arrived a whopping two and a half years late. Abraham Lincoln’s initial draft of the Emancipation Proclamation is among the treasures contained in the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress, and is viewable online here. www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-war-in-america/december-1862-october-1863.html#obj4

In fact, the Library plays host to a wealth of resources and materials related to the emancipation holiday and its celebration throughout American history, as well to the practice of slavery itself and to the voices of formerly enslaved people. Below you will find a list of new blog posts from throughout the Library highlighting a few such resources, including audio recordings from our poignant collection, “Voices Remembering Slavery: Freed People Tell Their Stories.” Other materials are being shared on our social media accounts throughout the day.

This year’s Juneteenth celebrations have special significance and poignancy in today’s climate where issues of racial injustice are again at the forefront. , I am hosting a virtual conversation with current National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Jason Reynolds and former National Ambassador Jacqueline Woodson about ways to hear and support kids during a period of nationwide protest against injustice. This event is part of our new online series "Hear You, Hear Me: Conversations on Race in America," which you can also learn more about below. You can watch it on our Facebook page, our YouTube channel or on our main website at loc.gov. I hope to “see” you there.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Juneteenth-Related Posts from Across the Library's Blogs

The Birth of Juneteenth; Voices of the Enslaved

Ralph Ellison’s “Juneteenth"
blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2020/06/ralph-ellisons-juneteenth/a

Born in Slavery: Portraits and Narratives of Formerly Enslaved People
blogs.loc.gov/picturethis/2020/06/born-in-slavery-portraits-and-narratives-of-formerly-enslaved-people/

Becky Elzy and Alberta Bradford: Spiritual Folklorists
blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2018/02/becky-elzy-and-alberta-bradford-spiritual-folklorists/

When a Former Enslaved Person Debated a Former Confederate in the House of Representatives
blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/06/when-a-former-slave-debated-a-former-confederate-in-the-house-of-representatives/


“Hear You, Hear Me”: Conversations on Race in America

This new online series features Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in conversation with some of the nation’s great literary figures, and will highlight what poetry and literature can offer the nation as it contends with foundational issues of social justice.

  • Jason Reynolds and Jacqueline Woodson: TODAY, June 19, 4-5 p.m. ET
  • Joy Harjo and Tracy K. Smith: Thursday, July 9, 7-8 p.m. ET
  • Colson Whitehead: Thursday, July 16, 7-8 p.m. ET

All of the conversations will be available for viewing after the launch.

Event details: blogs.loc.gov/national-book-festival/2020/06/hear-you-hear-me-virtual-programs-feature-conversations-on-race-in-america/
Videos: loc.gov/programs/national-book-festival/national-book-festival-presents/


The Boccaccio Project: Concerts in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Watch as the Library premieres as series of 10 commissions of new music from composers across America in The Boccaccio Project, inspired by a similar literary effort in the mid-14th century by Giovanni Boccaccio.

Watch as each concert premieres nightly at 8 p.m.June 15-26, or watch the full series: 
loc.gov/concerts/boccaccio-project/


Latest LCM Commemorates the End of World War II

In the new issue of the Library of Congress Magazine, we commemorate the 75th anniversary of end of World War II and the service of the men and women who fought in that conflict.

Features include:

  • a one-of-a-kind map, made by Japanese pilots that detailed the damage inflicted at Pearl Harbor
  • Manuscript Division collections that preserve photos taken in the field by Gen. George S. Patton
  • commentary by Pulitzer Prize-winner Rick Atkinson on a war whose consequences continue to unspool more than seven decades later

... and more. Download your copy today: loc.gov/lcm/


Save the Date! The 2020 National Book Festival is Going Virtual

The 20th Library of Congress National Book Festival will celebrate “American Ingenuity” in 2020, featuring the creativity and inspiration of some of the nation’s most gifted authors in a reimagined virtual festival the weekend of Sept. 25-27. The festival is part of the Library’s 220th anniversary year, and more details will be announced at a later date.

loc.gov/item/prn-20-039/


June Is LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month and June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Primary sources available at the Library of Congress provide detailed information about how this first Pride march was planned, and the reasons why activists felt so strongly that it should exist.

loc.gov/lgbt-pride-month/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Cultural Institutions in Times of Social Unrest

Friends,

Once again, America finds itself confronting difficult questions about race and inequality.

The struggle for freedom and equality dates back to our nation’s founding, and it is possible to find context and inspiration in the words of those who have fought for a more perfect union since the beginning.

But, libraries offer more than just historical context on today’s events. They offer safe spaces to have difficult conversations about the challenges facing our nation today. They are places of welcome and respite and community. They are collectors of the stories and experiences that have brought us to this place in our nation’s history and can inspire us to persevere in our efforts to pursue that more perfect union.

Last week, I hosted one such conversation with Smithsonian Institution Secretary Lonnie Bunch to discuss the future of our cultural institutions and how we remain accessible and relevant during a period of global pandemic coupled with nationwide protests against injustice.

Lonnie Bunch reminded all of us that “there is hope in history.” So, I leave you with a quote of his from our conversation and invite you to watch it in its entirety at loc.gov/item/webcast-9194/.

"So there’s a kind of, hopefully, a tipping point where people come together and recognize that the past should give you some hope. If people could work together to found the NAACP or work together to end slavery then we can work together to begin to address this as well. So I find hope in history. Not always optimism, but I find hope in history.”

Below you will find links to information about the NAACP collection at the Library of Congress along with other examples of courage and hope that have transformed our nation.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom

Originally mounted in 2009 and available online, this exhibition presents a retrospective of the major personalities, events, and achievements that shaped the NAACP’s history during its first 100 years.

Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Since 1964, the Library of Congress has served as its official repository, and the NAACP Records now consist of more than five million items dating from 1909 to the present. The records encompass a wide variety of materials, including manuscripts, photographs, prints, pamphlets, broadsides, audiotapes, phonograph records, films, and video recordings. Every phase of the NAACP's many activities can be found in this rich and diverse collection.

The NAACP Records are the largest single collection ever acquired by the Library and annually the most heavily used. These records are the cornerstone of the Library’s unparalleled resources for the study of the twentieth-century civil rights movement in the U.S. that also include the original records of the National Urban League, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, as well as the microfilmed records of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). 

loc.gov/exhibits/naacp/overview.html


 

Civil Rights History Project

On May 12, 2009, the U. S. Congress authorized a national initiative by passing The Civil Rights History Project Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-19). The law directed the Library of Congress (LOC) and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) to conduct a national survey of existing oral history collections with relevance to the Civil Rights movement to obtain justice, freedom and equality for African Americans and to record and make widely accessible new interviews with people who participated in the struggle.

The activists interviewed for this project belong to a wide range of occupations and the video recordings of their recollections cover a wide range of topics within the freedom struggle, such as the influence of the labor movement, nonviolence and self-defense, religious faith, music, and the experiences of young activists. Actions and events discussed in the interviews include the Freedom Rides (1961), the Albany Movement (1961), the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963), the Selma to Montgomery Rights March (1965), the Orangeburg Massacre (1968), the Poor People’s Campaign (1968), sit-ins, and voter registration drives in the South. The murder of fourteen year old Emmett Till in 1955, a horrific event that galvanized many young people into joining the freedom movement, looms large in the memories of many movement veterans.

loc.gov/collections/civil-rights-history-project/about-this-collection/


Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words

Rosa Parks (1913–2005) is best known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white man on a crowded bus in Montgomery, Alabama, on December 1, 1955. Her arrest sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a pivotal event in the civil rights movement that ultimately led to the dismantling of Jim Crow segregation. Rosa Parks became an icon of the movement, celebrated for this single courageous act of civil disobedience, but she is often characterized by misconceptions. Contrary to popular belief, Parks was not a demure seamstress who chose not to stand because she was physically tired. Her calm demeanor hid a militant spirit forged over decades.

Exhibition: loc.gov/exhibitions/rosa-parks-in-her-own-words/about-this-exhibition/
Blog post - "A Protestor Who Changed America": blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/06/a-protester-who-changed-america-rosa-parks/


 

Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

This exhibition tells the story of the seventy-two-year campaign for women’s suffrage. Considered the largest reform movement in American history, its participants believed that securing the vote was essential to achieving women’s economic, social, and political equality. For years, determined women organized, lobbied, paraded, petitioned, lectured, picketed, and faced imprisonment. Their collective story is one of courage, perseverance, savvy, creativity, and hope that continues to inspire activists today.

loc.gov/exhibitions/women-fight-for-the-vote/about-this-exhibition/


June Is LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month and June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Primary sources available at the Library of Congress provide detailed information about how this first Pride march was planned, and the reasons why activists felt so strongly that it should exist.

loc.gov/lgbt-pride-month/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Memorial Day Weekend Update from the Library of Congress

Friends,

I hope that you and your families remain well this month. On Monday, we will observe Memorial Day, honoring the service and sacrifices of members of our armed forces. Our nation is strong and it endures because of the men and women who give it their all in protecting and preserving our democracy.

Since 2000, the Veterans History Project (VHP) at the Library has been committed to collecting, preserving and making accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans. And while many of the stories collected are from living veterans, there are thousands that were donated posthumously by family members looking to preserve the legacies of their loved ones. “Say Their Name. Learn Their Story” is a wonderful blog post highlighting the stories of individuals who have given their lives in service of our country, and who are memorialized in the VHP collections. Read more here: https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2019/05/say-their-name-learn-their-story/

The Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public, with all public events currently canceled until further notice. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19. In the meantime, we invite you to continue to explore our content digitally through the resources listed below, and to connect with us on our social media channels.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Veterans History Project

Personal narratives, correspondence, and visual materials are collected and made available so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. Learn more about this important project as well how to collect and submit veterans’ stories by visiting loc.gov/vets/.

Experiencing War: Stories from the Veterans History Project

On Friday, May 8, the Veterans History Project (VHP) commemorated the end of World War II in Europe, also known as V-E Day, by releasing a new installment of the VHP online exhibit, Experiencing War. In this new online feature, you can explore the personal stories of 15 World War II veterans and what the end of the war meant for them. 

loc.gov/item/prn-20-035/


#FolklifeArchiveChallenge

Although some cities and states are starting to open up a little, we have a feeling it will be a while before we’re going out to concerts, theaters, jams, or open mics to perform or enjoy live music and performing arts. At the Library of Congress, we have an amazing online archive of folk music and folklife which you can explore right from home, and we’d like to offer a suggestion: why not learn a song, tune, poem, or story from the archive, make a recording or video of yourself performing it, and post it online? Or make a work of art based on one of our photos, or write a story or poem based on our materials. We’d love to see what you come up with! Folks from all genres and creators of all art forms are invited to interpret a field recording, video, photo, or manuscript from the AFC Archive. You don’t need to be a professional in order to participate!

Learn more about the challenge and how to participate:
blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2020/05/spending-a-lot-of-time-at-home-take-the-archive-challenge/


Suffrage History Webinar May 27

The Library’s Janice Ruth, curator of our Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote exhibition, will join curators from the National Archives and Records Administration and the Smithsonian’s National Portait Gallery for “Curator’s Cut: An Inside Look at DC’s Suffrage Exhibits.” This free webinar is being hosted by the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission.

Register here: https://bit.ly/2TjoWow


Virtual Concert May 28

The Library of Congress and Portland Ovations will present the International Contemporary Ensemble in the Library’s first interactive digital concert – “Aural Explorations: Farrin, Fure and Messiaen” – on Thursday, May 28, at 7 p.m. Eastern time.

The concert will feature the world premiere of the Library co-commissioned composition by Suzanne Farrin titled “Nacht,” capping a season-long celebration of women composers and performers honoring the centennial of women’s suffrage. The concert will also feature a world premiere of Ashley Fure’s “Interior Listening Protocol 1” paired with Olivier Messiaen’s “Louange à l'Éternité de Jésus” for ondes Martenot and Suzanne Farrin’s “Polvere et Ombra.”

loc.gov/item/prn-20-037/


Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America's history and are instrumental in its future success. Visit this multi-institution web portal hosted by the Library of Congress for featured content and resources.

asianpacificheritage.gov/


Jewish American Heritage Month

May is Jewish American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who have helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society. Visit this multi-institution web portal hosted by the Library of Congress for featured content and resources.

jewishheritagemonth.gov/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


The Library of Congress Turns 220

Since that beginning 220 years ago, the Library has grown to become the largest library in the world with a collection of more than 170 million items that document human creativity and achievement across the centuries and around the globe.

Collecting and providing access to these collections takes on a new meaning and significance in our current world. With social distancing as the norm, and more time spent at home, we want to continue to highlight ways to connect with our content, our knowledgeable staff, and each other during these times. From April 24 to 30, you can celebrate the Library’s 220th birthday by participating in online programs from across the Library, reading themed posts on our blogs and social media channels, and downloading our brand new app to explore the Library’s digital collections from home.

The Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public, with all public events currently canceled through July 1. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19. In the meantime, we invite you to our virtual birthday celebration and to continue to engage with us through some of the resources listed below. We look forward to continuing to serve you during this season and beyond.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


SPECIAL 220th BIRTHDAY VIDEO EVENTS

Citizen DJ Premiere & Virtual MasterclassFriday, April 24, 3 p.m. ET

Preview the new Citizen DJ app from Innovator-in-Residence Brian Foo, and discover how to make Hip Hop using the Library’s music collection. Presented by LC Labs.

America's Greatest Library: History of the Library of Congress
Saturday, April 25, 1 p.m. ET

Write. Right. Rite. A "Grab the Mic: Tell Your Story" video series with Jason Reynolds, National Ambassador for Young People's Literature.
Tuesday, April 28, 10:30 a.m. ET

Awareness to Action: Innovate for a Green Future
Wednesday, April 29, 11 a.m. ET

Join the U.S. Copyright Office for their next Copyright Matters lecture that will explore how creators—who through the copyright system can earn a living from their work—can play a key role in creating a vision of a green future and its untold benefits. Registration required.

Social Movement Changing America: The Legacies of the 19th Amendment
Thursday, April 30, 3:30 p.m. ET

A Law Day 2020 event presented by the Law Library of Congress and the American Bar Association. Registration required, space is limited.

Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic
Thursday, April 30, 7 p.m. ET

Prize-winning science writer David Quammen discusses his book "Spillover," in which he tracks the animal origins of human diseases through the centuries, with National Book Festival Co-Chairman David Rubenstein.

Discover more ways to engage with the Library during our birthday week and beyond:
https://www.loc.gov/engage/


Celebrate National Poetry Month with 50 Newly Available Audio Recordings

The Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress dates back to 1943 and contains nearly two thousand recordings of poets and prose writers participating in literary events at the Library’s Capitol Hill campus as well as sessions at the Library’s Recording Laboratory. New recordings added for 2020 include a 1978 reunion reading featuring 13 of our Consultants in Poetry, and Gwendolyn Brooks reading poems (including the iconic “We Real Cool”) in the Jefferson Recording Laboratory in 1961.

Visit the archive site.
Discover more on this blog post.


Try Activity Kits for the Whole Family

Encourage kids of all ages to use their creativity to complete activities inspired by the Library’s collections. With simple items found around the house and items from our website, kids can Cook Up History, Make a Mini-Book, Color Our Collections, and so much more. Visit the Resources for Family Engagement page to download activity kits and get started today.

https://www.loc.gov/families/


Join the Effort: By the People

We are grateful to all those who transcribe and review pages on the Library's virtual volunteering project By the People launched in 2018. As of the Library’s 220th birthday today, volunteers have transcribed over 125,000 pages from the papers of suffragists including Mary Church Terrell, Lucy Stone, and Susan B Anthony, civil rights activist Rosa Parks, poet Walt Whitman, President Abraham Lincoln, and many others. Once a whole item such as a journal or letter is complete, it is brought back to loc.gov where it radically improves search and discovery for patrons, and accessibility those who use screen readers.

https://crowd.loc.gov/


Preservation Week

National Preservation Week is April 26 – May 2. Preservation of the world's largest collection is accomplished through a broad range of activities distributed across the Library. Learn more about these preservation activities and the work to keep the collections available for the next 220 years and beyond.

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/


Coronavirus Updates from the Copyright Office

The Copyright Office has announced updated flexibility surrounding registration deposits and timing provisions for those affected by COVID-19 as outlined in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Visit the Copyright Office COVID-19 page for more info.

https://www.copyright.gov/coronavirus/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Preservation News: Topics in Preservation Series (TOPS) Webinars for Preservation Week 2020, Starting April 27

The Library of Congress Preservation Directorate is excited to present a Topics in Preservation Series (TOPS) for Preservation Week 2020! From April 27-May 1, we are hosting webinars every day at 11am (EST). The five, hour-long webinars will feature preservation related projects conducted at the Library of Congress. Register now for any, or all, of the following webinars at http://LOCPreservation.eventbrite.com or at the links below. For more information and resources related to preservation at the Library of Congress, visit https://www.loc.gov/preservation/

Keeping it Cool – Designing the Library’s New Gutenberg Bible Display Case

Monday, April 27th, 11am – 12pm Register here

The Library of Congress’ Gutenberg Bible is on permanent display in the Thomas Jefferson Building. Even though its three volumes are displayed on a rotating basis, the concerns about the adverse effects of long-term display required the Library’s’ conservation staff to create a purpose designed display case that would mitigate these adverse effects. The speakers will talk about the design process, present various features of the new case, and share with the audience some lessons learned now that the case is fully functioning for a little over a year.

Presented by Elmer Eusman, Chief, Conservation Division and Nancy Lev-Alexander, Head, Collection Stabilization Section

Acquiring and Developing an Offsite High Density Collections Storage Facility

Tuesday, April 28th, 11am – 12pm Register here

In addition to operating state-of-the art preservation quality storage facilities at Ft. Meade, the Library operates a rental property which meets its needs for interim storage.  This webinar discusses the Library’s experience in acquiring and developing this facility.  Cabin Branch (located in Landover, MD) shows a way to control costs without compromising on collections care.  The webinar will explain how the Library of Congress designed an interim storage warehouse with collections safety foremost in mind, while keeping cost under control by working with the developer to focus on the features most critical to safeguarding our collections.

Presented by Steve Herman, Chief, Collections Management Division; Rohn Roache, Assistant Chief, Collections Management Division; Nancy Lev-Alexander, Head, Collection Stabilization Section

Assessing the Condition of the United States National Collection

Wednesday, April 29th, 11am – 12pm Register here

A national research initiative funded by the Mellon Foundation “Assessing the Physical Condition of the National Collection” is undertaking the task to objectively assess the condition of books held in collecting institutions of the United States by performing an in-depth scientific analysis on a representative sample.

The research focuses on analyzing the same 500 volumes from five different research libraries in five different climatic zones through the time period 1840-1940. Research to date has shown some extremely interesting trends. This presentation will focus on the analytical techniques used in the program and show what this means to the preservation of print collections throughout the United States.

Presented by Fenella France, Chief, Preservation Research and Testing Division

Environment, Housing & Building Materials Testing to Protect our Collections

Thursday, April 30th, 11am – 12pm Register here

Challenges to preserving the national collection come from both inherent risks in the collections themselves and from materials in the immediate environment. The Library’s quality assurance program is focused on analyzing all materials that come into contact with collections or are part of the surrounding environment. The quality assurance (QA) program involves testing of materials used for housing, storage, and in conservation treatments, as well as evaluation, definition, and dissemination of standards for the use of these materials.

 This presentation will give specific examples of QA testing, new developments in quantification and identification of volatile organic compounds, fast and accurate test methodologies, examples of collection inherent material challenges, and assessment of off-gassing from potential building and housing materials to determine safety for special collections.

Presented by Dr. Eric Monroe, Supervisory Physical Scientist

Would You Like to Save Your Game?

Friday, May 1st, 11am – 12pm Register here

Libraries, archives and museums are facing an ever increasing amount of interactive media in their collections, including software applications, time based artworks and video games. These materials provide unique challenges in regards to acquisition, description and preservation, and many institutions are working to develop new approaches to ensuring the long term preservation of and access to born digital cultural artifacts. The Library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center (NAVCC) holds over 5,000 videogames amassed through copyright deposit and private donation. This collection contains not only a wide array of formats from 5.25” floppy disks to modern console cartridges, but also packaging, documentation, and adjacent materials such as magazines. The Preservation Reformatting Division and NAVCC work together to describe, reformat, and preserve these complex digital objects and preserve this important part of culture. This webinar will highlight different aspects of the preservation workflow.

Presented by Amanda May, Digital Conservation Specialist; David Gibson, Processing Technician; Laura Davis, Project Specialist

Click here for more information about the webinars.


A Message from the Librarian of Congress

Friends,

I hope that you are taking care or yourselves and your families as we settle into a new normal amid the COVID-19 pandemic. During these challenging times, the Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public with all public events currently canceled through May 11. However, while our physical doors may be closed, we are still here for you.

The Library’s vast online resources offer unlimited opportunities to discover something new for families, educators, researchers and anyone curious enough to join us.

Our dedicated and talented Library staff remain hard at work, remotely expanding online collections, cataloging, registering Copyrights and advising Congress, while also developing new virtual events and offerings that offer new ways to engage. Below you will find just a few ways that you can continue to find excellent programs and content from the Library.

Thank you for your support of the Library of Congress, and we invite you to continue to (virtually) engage with us safely at home. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Engage!

Children’s author and illustrator Dav Pilkey shares new activities and exciting videos every Friday. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-026/

Jason Reynolds, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, shares his passion for storytelling through a new monthly GRAB THE MIC newsletter and "Write. Right. Rite.," a twice-weekly "Grab the Mic" video series. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-028/

Poets Laureate Joy Harjo, Robert Pinsky, Natasha Trethewey and Juan Felipe Herrera talk to Ron Charles of The Washington Post about "The Poetry of Home" in a series for National Poetry Month. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-029/

Find more ways to engage with authors you love and connect to the Library’s resources from anywhere in the world on this new, frequently-updated page: https://loc.gov/engage/


Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words – Visit the Exhibition Online

Visit fascinating exhibitions online including our current exhibition on Rosa Parks which showcases rarely seen materials that offer an intimate view of Rosa Parks and documents her life and activism—creating a rich opportunity for viewers to discover new dimensions to their understanding of this seminal figure.

https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/rosa-parks-in-her-own-words/about-this-exhibition/


For Educators: Classroom Materials & Online Office Hours

The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. https://loc.gov/teachers/

Join Library of Congress education specialists for 20-minute topical presentations followed by Q&A every Tuesday and Thursday 2-3 p.m. ET. https://loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/office-hours/


Explore Digital Collections

Dive into the Library’s digital collections to explore just about any topic imaginable. Click through historical portraits and cityscape photographs, listen to sound recordings and oral histories, study American history and world cultures, discover local history and folklife traditions, explore maps, music, manuscripts and so much more. With digitized collections of more than 2.4 million items, it’s all at your fingertips.

https://loc.gov/collections/


Coronavirus Resource Guide

This is intended as a guide to laws, regulations and executive actions in the United States, at both the federal and the state level, and in various countries with respect to the new coronavirus and its spread. It also includes links to the Library's Congressional Research Service reports that provide information to Congress about the novel coronavirus. In addition, we provide links to relevant federal agency websites.

https://blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/03/coronavirus-resource-guide/


Ask a Librarian – We’re Open for (Online) Business

Most of the Library’s reference librarians are now teleworking in response to the coronavirus pandemic. But our Ask a Librarian service remains open! Submit questions to receive research or reference help.

More: https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/03/ask-a-librarian-were-open-for-online-business/­


Support the Library

Thank you for being an important part of the Library of Congress family. During these difficult times, we are more grateful than ever for your support. Your generosity helps keep us strong and allows us to be ready when crises lift. Please stay safe. Visit loc.gov/donate and consider making a gift to ensure the Library’s resources help everyone who needs them.

 


Thanks for Your Support!

Thank You!

Thank you for all you do to support the nation’s Library. With new books, films, and music arriving every day, the Library of Congress is your place to discover new ideas. Whether you support us with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of the world’s past, present, and future.

Spread the word and encourage your friends and family to visit us online or in person and make a gift to the nation’s library today!


Make Your Gift Before We Close the Books on 2019!

Make Your Gift Before We Close the Books on 2019

The Library of Congress is your place to discover new ideas. Visit our new exhibitions, join us for our events and educational programs and participate in our activities that connect you with millions of people around the world.

Join the community of people that helps ignite the power of ideas and make your tax-deductible donation today!


TODAY: Ignite the Power of Ideas

Make Your Gift to the Nation's Library

The day has arrived—#GivingTuesday—a day when your gift makes a difference and a statement.

The Library of Congress depends on the support of people like you for its exhibitions, programs, events and activities that connect millions of people across the nation and around the world with its unique collections, experts and services.

The Library of Congress is your gateway to discovery. New books, films and music arrive every day. New research and new stories reveal themselves every day. Join us on this #GivingTuesday, December 3, to help bring new ideas and experiences to life!

Spread the word today and encourage your friends and family to make a gift to the nation’s library, your gateway to understanding the world.


Ignite the Power of Ideas

On Tuesday, December 3, we ask you to make a gift to the Library of Congress in celebration of #GivingTuesday—a global giving movement.

Your gift supports exhibitions, events, programs and activities that connect millions of people across the nation and around the world with the unique collections, experts and services here at the nation’s library.

The Library of Congress is your gateway to discovery. New books, films and music arrive every day. New research and new stories reveal themselves every day. Help bring new ideas and experiences to life with your gift this #GivingTuesday, December 3.

Save the date to make your gift and visit loc.gov to see what’s new!


Preservation News: Are you coming to ALA DC? Take a Tour of Library of Congressa Preservation Services!

On Friday, June 21st, the Library’s preservation staff will be hosting two (2) behind the scenes tours of preservation labs and services in the James Madison Building. The tour is free, but registration is required and space is limited.

  • For the morning tour - Friday, June 21 at 10:00-11:30 am – register here.
  • For the afternoon tour - Friday, June 21 at 1:30-3:00 pm – register here.

Click here for more information about preservation programming throughout the week of ALA, including behind-the-scenes tours of Preservation at the Library, an information pavilion at the Exhibition Hall, and an open house in the Jefferson Building.


Blu-ray & 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Release Guide - October 10, 2021 - October 16, 2021

Approaching the halfway mark already for the month of October already! Had your fill of pumpkin spice snacks, beer and other things yet? Awaiting delivery of your Scream Factory Halloween 4K releases? On Amazon, Halloween II is supposedly not shipping til the end of the month at best. Best Buy and Target have issues too. Invite Michael Myers to Thanksgiving Dinner?!??

Welcome to Volume 2 Episode 21 of our weekly release guide. A look at the highlights of what's coming to disc this week, as well as a look at announcements from last week.

4K Ultra HD Blu-ray/Digital Releases-

Another big week money wise for 4K discs.

New releases first. From 20th Century Studios, Free Guy starring Ryan Reynolds. Available as a standard edition, a Best Buy Exclusive SteelBook and as a Target Exclusive. I totally missed this one so I cannot even pretend to describe the premise. What's with the pink bunny suit?

 

The other new release this week is LionsGate's The Green Knight. This one had pretty good fanfare with the reviewers and moviegoers.

Moving on to catalog titles, first we look at one of Brian De Palma's legacies, referring to Carlito's Way. Available as a standard release and as a SteelBook edition, which again is absent from Amazon. These SteelBooks seem to only crop up at Best Buy and Target.

 

A set many have been looking forward to since Volume 1, Columbia Classics Volume 2 finally sees light of day after some delay. A couple of the titles I question, but there is certainly something for everyone, it includes Anatomy of a Murder, Oliver!, Taxi Driver, Stripes, Sense and Sensibility and The Social Network.

 

Inglourious Basterds makes its way to 4K in a standard edition and a Best Buy Exclusive SteelBook, because you know, Brad Pitt and company, right?

And finally, Kino Lorber releases Stephen King's movie adaptation Misery. Our review is already done for this one and it looks like KLSC has done a stellar job!

 

HD Blu-ray/Digital releases-

As far as blu-ray releases, this week hits a bit of a low, which is fine because overall the month is still red hot, and the 4K slate above hits me bad enough.

New release counterparts first, Free Guy and The Green Knight get theirs.

LionsGate's other obligatory appearances on the blu-ray release calendar includes The Colony (2021), an Escape Plan triple feature and Survive the Game. They also have three reissues this week.

Warner Archive has got a couple this week. Black Lightning: The Complete Fourth and Final Season and The Ghost Ship / Bedlam (Double Feature).

 

Warner Bros. releases a show that keeps on going, The Flash: The Complete Seventh Season.

Paramount releases Friday the 13th: 8-Movie Collection as a SteelBook this go round. TV mini-series The Haunting of Bly Manor gets a disc release this week. Also available as a double-feature that includes The Haunting of Hill House.

 

The Criterion Collection release of the week is High Sierra, a 1941 crime/adventure film starring Ida Lupino and Humphrey Bogart.

Normally I do not repeat release news for titles I already reported on that got subsequently delayed. This week I make that exception because it's news worthy. Arrow Video's 'fat-pack' release of Legend is sure to be sold out early. Also delayed but available now, He Came from the Swamp: The William Grefé Collection and The Snake Girl and the Silver-Haired Witch. [EDIT] TheSnake Girl and Silver-Haired Witch delayed once again[EDIT]

 

Slow week for anime, highlight (singular) would be Kuma Kuma Kuma Bear - Season 1.

Friday release, 1 concert, a couple of operas.

>Chicago - Double Feature: Now More Than Ever: History Of/The Terry Kath Experience
>Donizetti: Le Nozze in Villa
>Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier

Notable announcements from last week:

Marvel's Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings gets a street date on November 30th. Presently slated for 4K combo pack and a blu-ray release, it no doubt will be met with a Best Buy SteelBook and a Target Eclusive.

Shout! Factory's December batch of titles has been revealed. Currently Cartoon Saloon's Irish Folklore Trilogy, Going Berserk (Shout Select), Lady in a Cage, No Way to Treat a Lady, Trog and The Vampire Lovers (Collector's Edition) are listed as being released on the 14th or 21st. These titles join the already announced December titles of Shirobako: The Movie, Neon Genesis Evangelion and Krampus: The Naughty Cut (4K Ultra HD).

ClassicFlix will be releasing The Abbott and Costello Show: Season 1 on blu-ray December 14th.

4K Release Calendar

2K/BD Release Calendar

Which titles are you buying this week? Which ones are on your wishlist, be it to buy as an impulse buy or to wait for the right price?




The Incredible Hulk: The Complete Series Blu-ray Coming October 26th Detailed

He might not like it, but we love it when he gets angry! 

As we previously reported, all five seasons of the classic The Incredible Hulk series is coming to Blu-ray on October 26th! Starring the late, great Bill Bixby as anger-prone David Banner with Lou Ferrigno as The Hulk, the show ran for five seasons spanning 82 episodes and three made-for-television followup films. After doing some leg work trying to find out more about this release, we have some more details to share. 

This will be a 19-disc set holding all 82 episodes and two of the three made-for-television films - they didn't tell us specifically which ones but likely The Incredible Hulk Returns and Trial of the Incredible Hulk. There won't be a digital copy included. Each episode will also feature DTS-HD MA 2.0 audio mixes. 

Not to skimp things with this release, Universal is also plugging in a nice selection of bonus features to dig through:

  • “Pilot” Commentary with Writer, Director and Producer Kenneth Johnson
  • “Married” Commentary with Writer, Director and Producer Kenneth Johnson
  • “Prometheus” Commentary with Writer, Director and Producer Kenneth Johnson
  • Introduction with Kenneth Johnson
  • Introduction with Lou Ferrigno
  • Remembering The Incredible Hulk: An American Classic
  • Creating an Iconic Character: The Hulk
  • Behind the Success: The Story of The Incredible Hulk
  • Gag Reel
  • Inside an Episode: "Prometheus" Photo Gallery

They're not sending out advance review copies, but we'll absolutely be picking this one up and will share our thoughts as soon as we can! The set is up for pre-order and should street on October 26th if all goes well and there aren't any serious supplychain issues. 

Thanks for all of the pre-orders - they really do go a long way towards keeping our little operation up and running! 


Blu-ray & 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Release Guide - October 3, 2021 - October 9, 2021

If you buy 4K discs, starting this month you will begin to feel big time wallet fatigue. But remember, if you want the studios continue to releases your favorites on disc, your obligation is to purchase them. If you purchase them via our links we can continue to  provide you with the news and reviews that you have (hopefully) come to look forward to and enjoy. We appreciate your continued support.

Welcome to Volume 2 Episode 20 of our weekly release guide. A look at the highlights of what's coming to disc this week, as well as a look at announcements from last week.

4K Ultra HD Blu-ray/Digital Releases-

Normally we start with catalog titles first. There are so many to cover that I will break from the norm and list the single new release title first.

Space Jam: A New Legacy gets a pair of releases, a standard edition and a Best Buy Exclusive Steelbook. That SteelBook is coined to look like the original movie's SteelBook, pretty blah.

Most of this week's catalog releases all have a 'horror' theme, which is pretty appropriate for the month of October.

American Psycho gets a reissue as a Best Buy Exclusive SteelBook. Decent design, the slip cover acts as a mask. You're welcome by the way, I had bought the standard release literally before this release was announced.

 

Another reissue, but in reverse. Originally available as a SteelBook or as a multi-movie collection, The Hunt for Red October now gets a single sku standard edition release.

Next, Universal Classic Monsters Icons of Horror Collection gets a box set release that contains Dracula (90th Anniversary), Frankenstein (90th Anniversary), The Invisible Man and The Wolf Man (80th Anniversary) along with a bunch of extras. If that's not enough, also vying for your attention, individual SteelBook releases of Dracula, Frankenstein and The Wolf Man. I suspect they passed (for now) on one for The Invisible Man because it is not celebrating a milestone. Completionists will have to import it if they want it (for now).

 

Ha-ppy ha-ppy hal-o'ween. Finally, Michael Myers in 4K. Scream Factory is releasing Halloween (1978), Halloween II, Halloween III Season of the Witch, Halloween 4 The Return of Michael Myers and Halloween 5 The Revenge of Michael Myers. These releases are all pretty packed with extra features. Will they release all five (and beyond) as a single set? Maybe, but probably not.

 

HD Blu-ray/Digital releases-

Space Jam: A New Legacy gets a blu-ray release, a Target Exclusive Edition and a double-feature blu-ray release.

From Paramount, Audrey Hepburn: 7-Movie Collection. It's a nice way to have seven of her movies in one set. The only new title to the mix though is Paris When It Sizzles. From the 'MOD' label, Dead Again, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, The Time Machine (2002) and What Lies Beneath.

 

CBS TV via Paramount releases the 2020 mini-series The Stand and a double feature featuring both the 2020 and classic series.

From Sony, Escape Room: Tournament of Champions as a blu-ray, not 4K disc. Sort of figured a new release would have both.

Warner Archive Collection releases the long awaited Night Shift (1982) and Tex Avery Screwball Classics: Volume 3 this week. Under the standard label, The Nevers, Season 1 Part 1 gets released this week.

 

A week wouldn't be complete without a Criterion Collection release. This week there is just one title, Japanese horror Onibaba.

Animation/Anime highlights include Golden Kamuy: Season Three, The Irresponsible Captain Tylor: TV Series, Little Vampire, Nakaimo-My Little Sister Is Among Them!, Night of the Animated Dead and Tamayomi: The Baseball Girls.

 

Notable announcements from last week:

LionsGate has made it official, Ran will be making its way to 4K disc as a Best Buy Exclusive SteelBook. It will feature English and Japanese DTS-HD MA 5.1 Audio. Currently it is sitting at $20... not bad for a 4K SteelBook!

Speaking of Best Buy, they have an order link and have revealed cover artwork for The Wolf of Wall Street's 4K SteelBook. It's not listed as an exclusive so an Amazon link will likely be available soon. Check out the front cover here, but I warn you, it's pretty hideous.

Sony Pictures has announced a Karate Kid 4K collection. It will feature the original three Karate Kid movies starring Ralph Macchio and Pat Morita. Our wallets cannot get a break any time soon!

4K Release Calendar

2K/BD Release Calendar

Which titles are you buying this week? Which ones are on your wishlist, be it to buy as an impulse buy or to wait for the right price?




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